International Women’s Day: Make It Happen

International Women’s Day: Make It Happen
Today is International Women’s Day. Every year on March 8, women’s economic, political, and social achievements are celebrated around the world. The first observance was held in New York in 1909, organized by the Socialist Party of America in remembrance of the 1908 strike of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union. The United Nations declared it a holiday in 1977. Over the past 107 years, women in the United States have made incredible strides, gaining the right to vote, serving ... Read more
Share This

Bloody Sunday and the March Before Us

Bloody Sunday and the March Before Us
Fifty years ago today, “Blood Sunday” became one of the most important civil rights events in American history. The public was forced to come to terms with the violence, degradation, and inhumanity that African Americans were subjected to in many parts of the country. Up until the passage of the Voting Rights Act 1965, African Americans were dissuaded from, and denied the right to vote, throughout the South. Poll taxes, literacy questions, and requirements for whites to vouch for their ... Read more
Share This

Senator Mikulski Retires and an Era Ends

Senator Mikulski Retires and an Era Ends
“Do I spend my time raising money or raising hell?” These words were spoken by Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) as she announced her retirement from Congress today. The longest serving woman in Congress will not seek reelection to a sixth term when her tenure is up in 2016. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1977, Senator Mikulski was first elected to the Senate in 1986, making her the first woman elected to the esteemed chamber in her own right. She has become known as ... Read more
Share This

Embrace the Unk Unks

Embrace the Unk Unks
It’s easy to say no. It takes up far less time and energy to take the easy way out. It may even be human nature to try to avoid the difficult, time consuming, challenging choices. However, very little is truly impossible. More importantly, you will never meet your potential or create something important by immediately refusing to take on big tasks and daunting projects. Think about it—what are your big picture goals or your personal moonshot? You won’t get there by being the person who ... Read more
Share This

The Fryer’s Club

The Fryer’s Club
Vocal fry has taken over our speech patterns. You may not know what it means but you probably know what it sounds like. It’s also known as pulse register, laryngealisation, pulse phonation, creak, popcorning, glottal fry, glottal rattle, glottal scrape, or strohbass. Kim Kardashian and Zooey Deschanel are well known celebrity vocal fryers. Many singers like Britney Spears use digital modifiers to enhance the fry in their voice. Vocal fry is a graveling of the voice. It’s a ... Read more
Share This

The B Word

The B Word
When I began my first job out of graduate school I was fortunate to work directly for the CEO of the organization (who also happens to be the co-founder of Start Smart Career Center). We’ve clearly had a positive and valuable working relationship and it was a special connection from day one…which is what led me to make a rookie mistake that took a while to overcome. Due to my close relationship with “The Boss” I found it easy to use her as a fallback. One of my main job responsibilities was ... Read more
Share This

Policy Matters: Family and Sick Leave

Policy Matters: Family and Sick Leave
Policy Matters: Paid Family and Sick Leave The United States trails most countries in terms of the benefits we offer to workers when they need to take time off for family and medical reasons. In fact, we are the only developed country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave. On January 15th, President Obama made a major announcement that could change that. He is pushing to make changes in family leave programs, starting with federal employees. This move will have significant ... Read more
Share This

Look Before You Leap

Look Before You Leap
The New York Times Upshot just released a map of the United States which illustrates where working women are most common. Both men and women are unemployed in areas with high, concentrated poverty such as Appalachia, the Deep South, and the interior southwest. There are high female employment rates in areas of New England and the upper Midwest. Approximately 70 percent of women ages 25 to 54 are currently employed and that rate has been rising throughout the past few decades. The majority ... Read more
Share This

Take Your Commute From Boring to Brilliant

Take Your Commute From Boring to Brilliant
The average worker in the United States commutes about 25 minutes each way. That’s 50 minutes each day in “planes, trains, and automobiles.” If you’re like me and work in a major metropolitan city, that commuting time can soar to over an hour each way. If you add that time up, it equals a significant amount of sitting, boredom, and possibly frustration and anger at traffic, fellow drivers, and a myriad of things out of your control. I slugged through my travels on the train and in the car ... Read more
Share This

When I’m Part of the Problem

When I’m Part of the Problem
I’ve always been willing to pitch in, do my part, and stay late to get the job done. There haven’t been many jobs I’ve deemed “beneath me” and that means countless hours copying, organizing, collating, stapling, and on and on. I don’t have a lot of patience for complainers and I pride myself on never being accused of such. However, I’ve also learned that being the reliable “doer” puts me at a disadvantage. I can be counted on to do…no matter what that means, and sometimes it means ... Read more
Share This