Spinning Time Into Gold at Work

Spinning Time Into Gold at Work
If your work schedule requires a meeting every hour on the hour, skip this entry. But if you are like most people, you find yourself with some dead periods of 10, or 15, or 30 minutes between meetings or commitments.  If you have two or three of these a day, it is like “found” time, almost as good as gold. You can spend this gold in a variety of ways—chatting with co-workers, balancing your bank account, or taking a brief walk. All of these may be good choices, but they are also ... Read more
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8 Job Hunting Mistakes Made by Recent College Grads (Part 2)

8 Job Hunting Mistakes Made by Recent College Grads (Part 2)
Susan T. Evans is the Senior Director for Strategy at mStoner, a marketing and communications firm working with higher education and independent schools. susantevans.com | @susantevans Wait, what were we talking about? Oh, yeah, job hunting mistakes. We started this conversation with the first four in part one [LINK to part one post]. Notice I’m skirting around the typical—bad grammar in your cover letter or not sending a thank you note—that stuff is table stakes. Read on for my final four. ... Read more
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8 Job Hunting Mistakes Made by Recent College Grads (Part 1)

8 Job Hunting Mistakes Made by Recent College Grads (Part 1)
Susan T. Evans is the Senior Director for Strategy at mStoner, a marketing and communications firm working with higher education and independent schools. susantevans.com | @susantevans Who doesn’t remember their post-college-graduation job search? It’s a milestone and a time filled with anxiety. It’s the time when you most need professional advice, and the time when you are the least likely to ask for help. It was 33 years ago for me and I’m on my fourth career—in HR, IT, communications and ... Read more
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The B Word

The B Word
When I began my first job out of graduate school I was fortunate to work directly for the CEO of the organization (who also happens to be the co-founder of Start Smart Career Center). We’ve clearly had a positive and valuable working relationship and it was a special connection from day one…which is what led me to make a rookie mistake that took a while to overcome. Due to my close relationship with “The Boss” I found it easy to use her as a fallback. One of my main job responsibilities was ... Read more
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Words and Wisdom

Words and Wisdom
Words have power, both positive and negative. They can be curses, blessings, oaths, and threats. When arranged in a certain way, they can be poetry. Many words strung together on a page or a screen can turn into a great piece of literature or a boring report. One of the powers of words is that they evoke feelings. They can make us laugh or cry. They can convey kindness or bitterness, respect or disdain. They even have the power to give or take away someone’s hope. When mixed with ... Read more
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Mentors are Your Secret Weapon

Mentors are Your Secret Weapon
If you are just beginning your professional career you may not have someone who fills the role of mentor. You may wonder if, or why, you even need one. Things are going well on the job, and you feel comfortable with your boss and coworkers. Is a mentor really necessary? Mentors come in many different forms and they serve a variety of roles. If you participated in organized athletics in high school or college, your coach, in addition to helping you achieve on the playing field, may have ... Read more
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Policy Matters: Family and Sick Leave

Policy Matters: Family and Sick Leave
Policy Matters: Paid Family and Sick Leave The United States trails most countries in terms of the benefits we offer to workers when they need to take time off for family and medical reasons. In fact, we are the only developed country in the world that does not offer paid maternity leave. On January 15th, President Obama made a major announcement that could change that. He is pushing to make changes in family leave programs, starting with federal employees. This move will have significant ... Read more
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Look Before You Leap

Look Before You Leap
The New York Times Upshot just released a map of the United States which illustrates where working women are most common. Both men and women are unemployed in areas with high, concentrated poverty such as Appalachia, the Deep South, and the interior southwest. There are high female employment rates in areas of New England and the upper Midwest. Approximately 70 percent of women ages 25 to 54 are currently employed and that rate has been rising throughout the past few decades. The majority ... Read more
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Take Your Commute From Boring to Brilliant

Take Your Commute From Boring to Brilliant
The average worker in the United States commutes about 25 minutes each way. That’s 50 minutes each day in “planes, trains, and automobiles.” If you’re like me and work in a major metropolitan city, that commuting time can soar to over an hour each way. If you add that time up, it equals a significant amount of sitting, boredom, and possibly frustration and anger at traffic, fellow drivers, and a myriad of things out of your control. I slugged through my travels on the train and in the car ... Read more
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Networking, the New Professional, and the New Year

Networking, the New Professional, and the New Year
You’ve recently begun your professional career, and you want to do the right things to get ahead in your field. Everything you read and hear is that networking is what it’s all about. Career consultants suggest that you try to make 3 to 5 new contacts each week. To most people, that’s an overwhelming task. It’s even more daunting if you aren’t especially outgoing or if you tend toward shyness. In some ways, it simply seems gratuitous, uncomfortable, even ... Read more
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