Building Each Other Up While Breaking Down Barriers

Building Each Other Up While Breaking Down Barriers
“The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity.“ – V. Davis If you watched the Emmy’s last night (or even just caught some of todays’ highlights and buzz), you are likely aware that Viola Davis made history by becoming the first Black woman to win an Emmy for a leading role in a drama.  Whether or not you watch her show or are familiar with her work, is secondary to what her presence on that particular stage and the display of sisterhood that went on last ... Read more
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What Was I Saying? The Power of Self-Talk

What Was I Saying? The Power of Self-Talk
As so often happens, I find myself sitting at an airport waiting for a cross country flight. Since I am flying east to west coast today, I needed to get up in the middle of the night and arrive at the airport before sunrise. Sitting in my hotel room, trying to get motivated, a phrase from a Beckett novel that I had read somewhere went through my mind. “I can’t go on. I must go on. I’ll go on,” and, of course, I did. The phrase made me think of self-talk—that internal ... Read more
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Route Recalculation

Route Recalculation
On a recent trip to an unfamiliar place, I programmed my car’s GPS for my destination. Somewhere along the way, I decided to make an unscheduled stop to see a particular site. When I did so, the voice for my GPS came on and said “route recalculation.” For some reason, that phrase, and the tone of the automated voice, always sounds like a reprimand. It seems to subliminally indicate that I had a goal, and that I shouldn’t have deviated from it. For just a moment, I ... Read more
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Women You Should Know: Frances Perkins

Women You Should Know: Frances Perkins
The door might not be opened to a woman again for a long, long time, and I had a kind of duty to other women to walk in and sit down on the chair that was offered, and so establish the right of others long hence and far distant in geography to sit in the high seats. –Frances Perkins As we wind down the Labor Day weekend, we want to highlight a woman whose impact on workers in America is immeasurable. Today we celebrate the legacy of Frances Perkins and her numerous contributions to working ... Read more
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Are Millennials Really the Me, Me, Me Generation?

Are Millennials Really the Me, Me, Me Generation?
There have been think pieces published ad nauseum about generational practices and preferences at work. Millennials have been in the forefront as the generation du jour and it’s common for journalists and researchers to say that as a group, millennials value work-life balance and aren’t as professionally driven as their predecessors. Over the past ten years, I’ve been in numerous meetings or conversations where someone has painted millennials with a broad brush. They are idealists. They are ... Read more
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Beware Self-Proclaimed Experts

Beware Self-Proclaimed Experts
Perhaps you have tried it a time or two—passing yourself off as an expert and then rushing to become one. Maybe you padded your resume or job application by slightly overstating your technical expertise or your presentation skills.  When your boss asked you to fix a problem or fill in for a speaking engagement, you had to work fast to become as proficient as you had led her to believe you were. In the worst case scenario, you had no choice to but to admit your limitations and face the ... Read more
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It’s Time for a Different Legacy for Women

It’s Time for a Different Legacy for Women
On the nineteenth of May, 1919, a Joint Resolution of the 66th Congress of the United States of America proposed an amendment to the Constitution “extending the right of suffrage to women.” The actual language was simple: “The right of citizens of the United States shall not be denied by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” The House of Representatives passed the 19th Amendment by a vote of 304-90. The Senate approved it 56 to 25. Thirty-six states ... Read more
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Systems Laziness

Systems Laziness
We all know a co-worker who always leaves the copier without paper or manages to be unavailable when the assistant needs a few minutes of help with the phone. Then there is the long-term employee who never seems to see or care about needed operational change like updating policies or changing the letterhead to include the new mailing address.  These people are annoying but don’t create chaos. There is another type of worker, however, who is personally and professionally lazy, and that ... Read more
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Forget Failure. Learn From Success.

Forget Failure. Learn From Success.
In the workplace and in our professional lives, we often agonize about mistakes. Whether large or small, we go over them again and again, trying to understand how we could have misunderstood the situation, the request, or the data, or how we could have been so stupid. We analyze each mistake vowing to learn from them, and promising ourselves not to make that same mistake twice. We don’t look at our successes the same way, but perhaps we should. Are there factors that you can identify ... Read more
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When Mentoring Goes Bad

When Mentoring Goes Bad
You were excited to meet one of the leaders in your field. He said he liked the project you just presented and that the topic was of special interest to him. He gave you his business card and suggested you give him a call next week so you can talk further. You think this might be the big break you have been waiting for—your chance to have the attention and support of a giant who can help you move up that career ladder. You are hoping you have found a mentor. You do call, and he is ... Read more
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